Lisa Saunders & Mystic Seafarer's Trail

Lisa Saunders

Author, TV talk show host, and CMV fighter

New York 9th Heavy Artillery

 

 

 

(Largely a Cayuga and Wayne County Regiment although men also from Albany, Genesee, Oswego, Onondaga, Ontario and Tompkins counties)

3rd Division 2nd Brigade of the 6th Corps (Union - 6th Corps )

THE NEW YORK NINTH HEAVY ARTILLERY TIMELINE

 

 

(The Civil War Archive Union Regimental Index New York: Regimental histories from A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion by Frederick H. Dyer, 1385)

 

Sept 1862-Aug 1863 Stationed near Washington DC http://www.nps.gov/rocr/ftcircle/

(Forts Bunker Hill, Kearney, Mansfield, and Reno)

Aug 1863-May 1864 Built Fort Foote http://www.nps.gov/fowa/foote.htm

May 18, 1864 Joined the Army of the Potomac

May through June Rapidan Campaign

May 26 North Anna River North Anna

May 26-28 On line of the Pamunky River

May 28-31 Totopotomoy Creek Totopotomy

June 1-12 Cold Harbor Cold Harbor, http://www.nps.gov/rich/ri_cold.htm

June 1-3 Bethesda Church

June 18-19 Before Petersburg

June 18-July 6 Siege of Petersburg Petersburg

June 22-23 Jerusalem Plank Road, Weldon Railroad Jerusalem Plank Road

July 6-8 Move to Baltimore

July 9 Battle of Monocacy Monocacy

August 7 - November 28 Shenandoah Valley Campaign

August 21-22 Near Charlestown

August 29 Charlestown

September 19 Battle of Winchester Winchester

September 22 Fisher?s Hill Fisher's Hill

October 19 Battle of Cedar Creek Cedar Creek , http://www.cedarcreekbattlefield.org/, Order of Battle

Through December Duty at Kernstown

December 3 Moved to Washington, DC, then to Petersburg

Dec 1864-April 1865 Siege of Petersburg Petersburg National Battlefield (National Park Service),

http://www.pamplinpark.org/

March 25, 1865 Fort Fisher

March 28-April 9 Appomattox Campaign

April 2 Assault and fall of Petersburg Petersburg, http://www.petersburgbreakthrough.org/

April 5 Amelia Springs Amelia Springs

April 6 Sailor?s Creek Sailor's Creek

April 9 Appomattox Court House Appomattox Court House

Surrender of Lee and his Army

April 17-27 Expedition to Danville

Till June Duty at Danville and Richmond

June 8 Corps Review

 

Regiment losses:

10 Officers and

204 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded

247 Enlisted men died by disease.

461 Total

 

Also see: www.civilwararchive.com/Unreghst/unnyart1.htm

 

Excerpt taken from Ever True:A Union Private and His Wife. Civil War letters between Private Charles McDowell and his wife Nancy Wager McDowell plus background information of Seward?s New York 9th Heavy Artillery of Wayne and Cayuga Counties, edited by Lisa Saunders. To purchases an autographed copy, contact Lisa at saundersbooks@aol.com

or purchase through the publisher at:

http://www.heritagebooks.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=HBI&Product_Code=S2526&Category_Code=

 

Excerpt from Chapter One:

 

Upon Charles McDowell?s enlistment in Lyons, Charles and Nancy traveled to Auburn, where the men of Wayne and Cayuga Counties were being organized into what would initially be designated the 138th Regiment New York Infantry. They were to serve under Secretary of State Seward?s son, William H. Seward, Jr. Although that association did not protect Charles?s regiment from marching to the front, it would bring him in close contact with not only the Secretary of State, but with President Lincoln as well.

William H. Seward, Jr. left his position in banking to become the Lieutenant Colonel of [the New York 9th Heavy Artillery].

The young Mrs. Janet W. Seward recalls the events leading up to her husband?s departure for Washington with the regiment: ?Of course we talked about my husband?s going, but I was in hopes he would not have to do so; but one afternoon, while I was spending the day with my mother, who was not well, he came in with his hand behind him, sat down before me and unwrapped a parcel and gave to me a large photograph of himself. I knew instantly that he was going to leave me. I hope that I took it bravely, but I cannot exactly remember. After that, there were a great many preparations to make and the time went altogether too fast? (Roe, Alfred Seelye, The Ninth New York Heavy Artillery, Worcester, MA, 1899, 393)

In Auburn, while waiting to be sent to Washington, Charles McDowell lived among the other recruits in Camp Halleck, where he learned the basics of soldier discipline. The men slept in tents with three-tiered bunks; each covered with a thin pile of straw and a blanket. The ground where they lay and imagined the battles ahead is now covered with homes and located on what is presently known as Camp Street.

"Perhaps no more ludicrous incident is recalled of the story in Camp Halleck than that on parade, when Lieut. Colonel Seward's horse, like many of the soldiers, just from the farm, deliberately lay down, so frightened was he at the firing of the cannon. Even military dignity could not restrain the risibles of amused beholders" (Roe 17).

On the 8th of September, Charles, a member of Company D, was mustered into the service of the United States for three years. Within the next few days, he received his uniform.

On September 12, Charles was roused at 4:00 a.m. and began the greatest adventure of his life. But he began it quietly. They marched past Lieutenant Colonel Seward?s house on their way to the train station, where Seward?s young wife and newborn child lay sleeping. Janet Seward wrote: ?On the 11th, our first daughter was born. On the 12th, very early in the morning, I was aroused by an unusual sound, and listening, found that it was the steady tramp of many feet passing the house. No other sound but a few words of command in a lowered voice that I knew so well. It was our regiment marching to take the train for Washington. It was really to me the most mournful sound that I ever heard. No drum, no fife, nothing but the quick, firm steps; and all the stillness was for my sake? (Roe 393-394).

Nancy was not at the train station to see Charles off. She returned to the home of her parents in Rose, N.Y.

 

To Nancy from Charles:

 

[New York City]

September the 13 - 1862

I thought I would take a few minutes to write to you letting you know how we are a getting along.

We started from Auburn Friday morning at eight o' clock and we was in New York Saturday morning at 6 o clock. We was met with great cheers all the way along. We are stationed right near Broadway and it?s the liveliest place I ever see. They have the most ways for making money you ever see. They drawed us through the City with horses. Four horses to two cars and we had twenty-two passengers besides some freight cars.

We expect to get our guns before we leave here.

This is a beautiful place. We had two girls come and dance for us today. They both danced and played an accordion all at once. The nicest I ever saw.

I want you to write and let me know when you started for home. I looked for you all the next day. I didn?t know whether you had gone or not but it was the lonesomest day I ever saw. I hope I will never feel so again.

Our guns has just come and I think we will start right off. Don?t write till you hear from me again.

Your ever true and affectionate husband

 

To Nancy Wager McDowell from her husband Charles McDowell (A Canadian who enlisted in the New York 9th Heavy Artillery of the 6th Corps):

DURING THE SIEGE OF PETERSBURG [Near Petersburg] January the 1-1865

Dearest Wife

Old Eighteen and Sixty Five has got around and I ain?t much sorry either. But time passes fast with us now. It soon will be spring. Now we have easy times. It is awful muddy now. The most we do is to get our wood and that ain?t very hard work. I wouldn?t care if it would keep muddy all winter.

There has been a good [many] soldiers buried around here. You may go any way you are a-mind to and you will see graves throwed up. When we went after wood the other day, we found a man's skull laying a top of the ground. He hadn?t hardly any dirt throwed over him.

I counted twenty- six ball holes in a tree about a foot through. This was done the time we took the railroad and they charged on us but they got badly whipped. Some of our regiment got taken prisoners last night. Co. M and some of the other company went out yesterday morning on picket. Our company didn?t happen to go, and about two O?clock this morning, we was waked up by the yelling and shooting of the rebs. They made a charge on them. I haven?t heard exactly how many of our regiment there was taken. They say thirty-five or forty-two killed, and five or six wounded. Our boys brought in a few of the rebs. They come on them by surprise.

There is a good many deserting from the rebs most every night and come over here. I think this war will end this winter. It looks more like it now than it ever did before since I enlisted, but we can?t tell this war business is very uncertain. But I find most every one thinks so. I hope so anyway. I would like to have it come to an end this winter.

You would have laughed to have seen us tumble out of bed when the rebs charged on our picket line this morning. We tumbled over one another pretty fast. We was soon in a line. We didn?t know but they would try our line of battle but they knowed better than to try that. If they had they would have had a nice time.

You said you would like to have me come home on a furlough. I would like to go home as well as you would like to have me come but I don?t know whether there will be any more furloughs given or not. I think it will be a pretty hard thing to get one. Isae Woodruff started for home the other day. He had a furlough for fifteen days. He has been trying for one ever since his father died and if it hadn?t been for his father dying, he couldn?t have got one.

You say we can afford it as well as any body. Well I think we could, but if we save the money that it would cost me to come home, we can have so much more to spend. You know we will want to go a- visiting some when I get there. We might happen to get back to Washington yet this winter.

When we get orders to move, we don?t stop to tell long stories. We hear Dunbar and them other fellows is coming back to the regiment. I hear that Lee has give Lucy all of his property to keep till we comes back, then I suppose he will take her too. I wonder if he washed his face since he has been home. Robert Trevor is most well. Old Jef Davis is at home now.

I helped carry Jef in when he was wounded. I couldn?t help but laugh and felt sorry for him to hear what expressions he made. He said it was too bad. He said there was a reb captain come up to him after he was wounded and commenced turning him over to search him. He asked him what he wanted and he said his money and Jef told him [he] would get it for him. He said he put his hand in his pocket and handed his pocket book and the captain took the money out and throwed the pocket book down and a boy came along and he gave him the pocket book for a drink of water.

He would almost cry when he told about that. He said he thought it was too bad after shooting him to take the last cent he had. He said they took twenty-four dollars and ninety-five cents, which he had worked hard for. And he said there was some more come up to him and said, ?You are wounded, are you old fellow?? And Jef said, ?Yes.? ?Well,? they said, ?we will be a long with the ambulances and take you to Richmond you dammed Yankees. We will give you Fishers Hill!? Now I bet you Jeff?s eyes stuck out then. And, he said, in about two hours he seen them going back pell mell as hard as they could run and the Sixth Corps after them. He said then he felt glad. This was about now he laid there on the ground till next day noon before we found him.

That is what hurts the men so, laying on the ground so long after they are wounded. They took lots of money from our boys that day. I could have made a thousand dollars if I had a-went around an got our wounded and killed and searched them, but I wouldn?t do such a thing but there is lots of them that does do it and the boys had lots of money then.

There is a good many of our wounded a- coming back to the regiment now. There was two come today that was wounded to Monocacy, besides a good many new recruits. There was one come a few days a go, just like John Tree. You know him. The one we had so much fun with when we was at Fort Foote. The boys had lots of fun with him and night before last we left and we ain?t seen him Since. I don?t think they will look for him much.

It?s a- getting so cold. I don?t know but we shall heft to set up tonight and keep a fire. It is a-freezing fast. But we had the good luck to make a haul on a couple of blankets the other night when we was guarding baggage. I find a man has to look out for himself here. If he don?t, nobody else will look out for him. My cousin was over to see us the other day. He is pretty sick of the war.

I think I must write a letter to Canada before long. I haven't wrote to them since you left. Don?t you think it is too bad it has been so long since I wrote? I feel most ashamed to write now. I shall heft to apologize pretty well. I must write within a few days. Anyway I have had three or four letter from them this summer. Uncle Hiram has been a- trading farms lately. As soon as my time is out I think I shall go and see them Sometimes when I get to thinking about my native land and what good times I have had there it makes a feeling come over me that makes me feel sad.

Little did I think when I left home that I would be gone for seven years. Oh how I long to see my sister Margaret and all the rest, and if I get out of this alive it won?t be long before I can see her. She thought [my likeness] an awful sight. She feels pretty bad about us. She is afraid we will never come home alive but I live in hopes that we will come out all right.

And I must tell you what we had to eat for News Years. We didn?t draw no rations yesterday and we hadn?t nothing for supper last night, only coffee and nothing for breakfast this morning only we got an order and went and bought some bread. So we had bread, beef and coffee, and drawed rations after breakfast. So we had hardtack, coffee and pork for dinner. ain?t that pretty good? It?s getting so cold I must draw my letter to a close hoping soon to get an answer. We expect to go on picket now every day but I hope not till it gets a little warmer. I have just heard that they only captured twenty- three of our men.

From your ever true and affectionate husband C McDowell


Notes: The above letter is one of about 150 Civil War letters I found in my mother?s attic between Charles and Nancy Wager McDowell and their families. Charles McDowell was born in Simcoe, Ontario, Canada on 15 Feb. 1837. His family later moved to Norwich, Ontario, Canada. As a young man he and his brother David McDowell moved to Geneva, NY where Charles married Nancy Wager 24 Dec. 1860 when she was just 15. Despite his father's pleas (John McDowell of Norwich, Ontario) Charles enlisted in Lyons, New York in 1862. He served in the New York 9th Heavy Artillery under Secretary of State Seward's son, William H. Seward Jr., of Auburn, NY. The regiment was nicknamed "Seward's Pets" because the Secretary of State frequently visited his son's regiment and often brought along Lincoln. In the letters I read of a remarkable devotion to one another despite war?s infidelities, scandals and ever-present threat of death as well as Charles?s devotion to his new country. I also gained new insight into a wife's role in the camp life, a Canadian family?s views on the war and their participation, hangings, prostitution, amputations, desertions, theft and murder among Union troops, personal contacts with Lincoln and Seward (of "Seward's Alaskan Folly"), battles of Cold Harbor, Jerusalem Plank Road, Monocacy, Opequon, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, the Siege of Petersburg, Moseby's Men, and the Shenandoah Valley Campaign. Among my family?s papers I also found photographs of most of the letter writers as well as Nancy Wager McDowell's obituary which reads: "MRS. MCDOWELL IS DEAD - SHOOK HANDS WITH LINCOLN. With the death of Mrs. Nancy Wager McDowell...the town of Sodus probably loses the distinction of having a resident who could boast of having shaken hands and talked with the martyred Lincoln?She was married in 1860 to Charles McDowell, a native of Canada, who came to America when a young man. Mr. McDowell was a member of the Ninth New York Heavy Artillery in the Union Army and it was while stationed near Washington that his wife had an opportunity to speak with the President. Mrs. McDowell passed nearly a year in that vicinity and many were the pies she baked for the soldiers stationed at the capital. Typhoid Fever caused her to return to Alton to the home of her parents?" ("The Record," Sodus, Wayne County, N.Y. September 18, 1931) Charles McDowell died 17 April 1913. Their two children were May Belle (born 4 Aug. 1871) and Gilbert (born 6 Mar. 1883). Gilbert?s children were Gilbert and Russell (grandfather).

The letters, along with background information and era recipes are found in my book: Ever True: Civil War Letters of Seward's New York 9th Heavy Artillery of Wayne and Cayuga Counties Between a Soldier, His Wife and His Canadian Family

If you would like to see pictures of Charles and Nancy McDowell and read more letters, please visit my website at www.authorlisasaunders.com

The transcribed letters of Charles McDowell and his wife, Nancy, display remarkable devotion, and offer readers a unique perspective of the Civil War. Read little known details about: hangings; prostitution; amputations; desertions; theft and murder among Union troops; personal contacts with Lincoln and Seward (of "Seward's Alaskan Folly"); battles of Cold Harbor, Jerusalem Plank Road, Monocacy, Opequon, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, the Siege of Petersburg, Mosby's Men, and the Shenandoah Valley Campaign. This story is cohesive and informative yet charming and romantic in a very personal way. Vintage photographs enhance the text.

To learn more about EVER TRUE: http://www.authorlisasaunders.com/mycustompage0003.htm

 

Links:

 

Newspaper clippings on the regiment: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/artillery/9thHeavyArty/9thHeavyArtyCWN.htm

Another letter from Charles McDowell

 

New York York Military Musuem

http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/mil-hist.htm

Gggrandaughter, Lisa Saunders (saundersbooks@aol.com) Lisa is a member of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War and Daughters of the American Revolution. See her book Heritage Books:EverTrue: Civil Warletters of Seward?s New... ...EverTrue: Civil War letters of Seward?s New York 9th HeavyArtillery of...Cayuga Counties between a soldier, his wife and hisCanadian family -LisaSaunders..

New York State Historical Association Research Library
http://library.nysha.org/entry_list.asp

A Guide to New York Historical Resources
http://www.areavibes.com/library/new-york-historical-resources/ 

Map and explanation of the Battles in Virginia:

Virginia Civil War 1864 Map of Battles

The Civil War in American Virginia 1865 Map of Battles

Photographs

US Army Regulations Illustration: Link 146 Chasseur Type Forage ...(The hat worn by the 9th)

 

GAR - Photographs

New York 9th Heavy Artillery reunion banner and photos of soldiers:

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/33dny/wayne.htm

Reunion Banner with photo of Nellie Seward (for sale):

http://www.decodog.com/inven/military/fa28053.jpg

Photo for sale of unknown 9th Soldier:

http://www.liveauctioneers.com/auctions/ebay/302412.html

 

Battle Flag:

9th Regiment Artillery (Heavy) NY Volunteers Battle Flag - NY ...

 

Sites I found using a www.google.com search:

 

9th NY Heavy Artillery Regiment during the Civil War - NY Military ...

History - New York Artillery (Part 1)

Union Regiments - New York

Roster No.3, New York Soldiers, Heavy Artillery 9th - 10th

9th Regiment New York Heavy Artillery

Cedar Creek After Action Report, Commander, 9th New York Heavy ...

GenealogyDirect.com - MONOCACY [MARYLAND]: Company A, 9th New York ...

Heavy Artillery Regimental Loss Table

SIXTH ARMY CORPS

Order of Battle

Heritage Books: Ever True: Civil War letters of Seward?s New ...

Danvill Prison where many 9th soldiers were held after the battle of Monocacy:

http://www.censusdiggins.com/prison_danville.html

Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation

Battle of Winchester:http://www.pathsofthecivilwar.com/Pastfinder/PCWsummaryALL.asp?locationID=VA119

Story of New York 9th Heavy Artillery Doctor Sabin who happened to be at Ford's Theater:

Palmyra, New York's history page

Western New York Civil War Regimental Histories

GARcommanders

9th NY Heavy Artillery: ROster of Survivors 1902

http://members.dslextreme.com/users/dhj001/familystories/PetersburgAAR.html Other regiments in the 6th Corps: http://www.davidhjones.net/familystories/SixthMDdescendants.html

Research these sites:

http://www.rootsweb.com/~nygenweb/

The William H. Seward House

The Old Jail Museum
Cayuga County Genealogy Resources

New York State Archives:

http://www.archives.nysed.gov/aindex.shtml

GARcommanders

GAR--Commander-in-Chief Alfred E. Stacey

http://mywebpages.comcast.net/33dny/wayne.htm

US Army Military History Institute Homepage

Civil War Photos and Images

Selected Civil War Photographs Home Page

American Civil War Homepage
http://sunsite.utk.edu/civil-war/warweb.html

Also check out:

http://sunsite.utk.edu/civil-war/unit2.html

General Civil War:

www.cwc.lsu.edu

http://homepages.dsu.edu/jankej/civilwar/civilwar.htm

Canada Civil War Association

www.markvinet.com

Civil War Ezine

http://www.civilwarcampchest.com/ezine.htm

 

Recommended Books:

The Ninth New York Heavy Artillery. A history of its organization, services in the defenses of Washington, marches, camps, battles, and muster-out ... and a complete roster of the regiment AUTHORS: Roe, Alfred Seelye, PUBLISHED: Worcester, Mass., The author, 1899. 9th NYHA Images (Names of New York 9th Heavy Artillery Leaders and a few privates) NOTE: The facsimile copies of Roe's regimental: The Ninth New York Heavy Artillery is available for $57.00 (plus postage) from Higginson Book Company (148 Washington Street) PO BOX 778 Salem, MA 01970. Phone is 978-745-7170. website: www.higginsonbooks.com. The book is also available at: http://www.wardhousebooks.com/NewYork.html. The book is also being typed for online research. If you'd like to read exerpts and perhaps help type, please visit: "Wayne County NY Military Roe's History of the 9th Artillery
The Ninth New York Heavy Artillery. A History of its Organization, ... Camp Morris and the 9th Heavy Artillery -this typing includes Chapter V, above, ... http://www.rootsweb.com/~nywayne/roe/9thnyindex.html"

 

Heritage Books: Ever True: Civil War letters of Seward?s New ...
... Ever True: Civil War letters of Seward?s New York 9th Heavy Artillery of ... Cayuga
Counties between a soldier, his wife and his Canadian family - Lisa Saunders.

 

Wayne County Troops in the Civil War: Letters from the Front

by R.L. Murray (visit www.nyincivilwar.com)

 

Another book by Alfred Seelye Roe about the Battle of Monocacy:

GenealogyDirect.com - MONOCACY [MARYLAND]: Company A, 9th New York ...

 

Clark, Lewis H., The County in the Civil War, New York: Clark, Hulett, Gaylord 1883 (The Wayne County Historical Society has a copy)

 

Cooling and Owen, Mr. Lincoln?s Forts , Shippensburg, PA: White Mane Press, 1988

 

 

Descendents of the New York 9th Heavy Artillery:

If you would like to be a part of an official registry, please contact http://www.petersburgbreakthrough.org/

 

To be mentioned below with your e-mail address, contact me, author of EVER TRUE: A Union Private and His Wife at saundersbooks@aol.com

 

CARTER, GEORGE W.,1842-1900, 9th N.Y. Art.. Co. A. (Al Gummerson, his grandson, can be reached at: alg0912@bellatlantic.net)

 

Champion, Henry. He enlisted on Sept 19, 1863 and was honorably discharged Sept 29 1865. He was a Private in Company 9th NY co. A - Heavy Artillery and he was transferred into the 2NY Co L in July 6, 1865. He enlisted at Fulton, Oswego Co, NY. On his application for pension it said he enrolled in NY and served in the Civil War and was honorably discharged at Washington DC Sept 29 1865. His pension # is 683337 at Buffalo, NY and #908794 pension claim # on another form. He was born in Oswego NY and also lived in NY and Toledo Ohio and died in New Bremen, NY. Submitted by great-great grandaughter, Lisa Kit Matulich, dalmatianalley@wowway.com

Cornell, Alpheus P. (Company A): A veteran of both the Mexican and Civil wars. He was born April 2, 1821 in Redwood, Jefferson Co. N.Y. He married Hannah Jane Gilfus and they settled at Butler Center N.Y. Alpheus enlisted on Dec. 17, 1863, at the age of 42, in Auburn N.Y., was assigned to Co. A 9th NYHA and left for Washington D.C. in Jan. 1864. He survived the long marches of 1864 and the winter of 1864 and 1865 at Petersburg Va. His Last march took him from Petersburg to Appomattox to Danville, and finally back to Washington D.C. for the Grand Review. He was reassigned to Co. L 2nd NYHA after the Grand Review and finished his enlistment at Fort C.F. Smith in Va., just across the Potomac from Washington D.C. Alpheus died in 1900 at Mount Morris N.Y. and is buried in the cemetery of the Butler Center Methodist Church where he was caretaker for many years. Alpheus was my GGGrandfather. Alexander.MacLeod@oft.state.ny.us

Bell, Alfred J :sodus, wayne county ny and his brother charles was also in the 9th. Alfred passed away in aug 1896 in brighton, monroe ny. his daughter julia married oscar haserodt and their son edward married blanche maddock. their daughter blanche haserodt married jim wintringham and had 4 kids, james jr., alice, sandra and nancy, all of whom are alive as well as their 18 children,37 grandchildren and 28 great grandchildren just in this branch. From 4th gr.daughter, kim anglebrandt kimandgary2004@yahoo.com

 

Craver, Charles served in the 9th Heavy Artillery Regiment. Charles enlisted in Company C in Sep 1864 at the age of 30, and was mustered out Jul 1865 in Frederick, MD. Charles, born in Oneida Co, NY, married Mary on 7 Jul 1856 at the Holy Family Church in Auburn, NY. The Cravers had four children: George, Charles Jr, Roselee, and Mary Elizabeth. Mary died when her youngest child was an infant, and Charles eventually remarried (Sarah). Gggrandniece of Mary Jetty Craver, Donna Bancroft Green (redhouse06@yahoo.com)

 

Crittenden, Josiah Taft of Bergen, NY, Company M. (Originally in 22nd. Independent battery, then changed to the 9th.)

Josiah Taft Crittenden was the son of Josiah Griswold and Laura Evarts Crittenden of Bergen, (Genesee Co., NY) NY. He enlisted at age 35 in Bergen on August 30, 1862. Was a member of the 22nd. NY Independent Battery. The 22nd. became part of the 9th Heavy artillery he was in Company B and M. He was promoted to Sgt., later to 1st. Lt. on January 16, 1865. He was discharged on May 15, 1965. He returned home to Bergen, NY where he resumed his farming. He had 3 children by his first wife, Harriet Hunt Crittenden of Riga, NY. (2 sons and 1 daughter). In 1900 he moved to California with his third wife. By 1910 he had returned to Bergen where died at the age of 84 on January 15. He was buried in Mt. Rest Cemetery also in Bergen. He attended the 1898 reunion the 9th! He was twice Commander of the Wilbert Fuller Post, G.A.R.

Diane Lobb-Boyce, Great-great daughter rdboyce@mhonline.net

 

Denney,Loren enlisted 8/7/1862-Disch 7/16/65 as a corporal. CO.B.Belonged to GAR Post 406, Ontario, NY Chartered 10/11/83.Died in 1912. Ggranddaugther, Shirley Boris (sjb4728@rochester.rr.com), Member of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War. "My Gr. Uncle Eugene Sanders (Lorens Brother-in-law. Joined the same day and discharged the same day.They were together all the time.He was disch a Sergeant. They are both buried close together in Furnaceville Cemetery, Ontario, NY."

 

Augustus Hall Fenn. I am William Smith Hall Jr. (Ae 67), ima_cookie_muncher@yahoo.com. My Great, Great Uncle was Augustus Hall Fenn.

 

Garrity, Patrick (Company K). Mortally wounded in the Battle of Cold Harbor. Gggrandson Mark Flora (Mark_Flora@nps.gov) See Obit:

Death of a Soldier. Patrick Garrity, ofCo. K, 9thN.Y. Artillery, died in Hospital at Washington of a wound received on the 4thday of June1864. Lt. Flynn, in writing to Mrs.Garrity, informing her of her husbands death says: --When I read the news of his death to the men of our company last night, I could not help noticing the sad effect it had on them, as each would exclaim, ?Poor fellow!? ?too bad!?&c whilst many a rough coat sleeve passed over a brown face, to wipe away the big tear drop that glittered in the pale moon beam, showing though rough and uncouth the soldier may appear, his heart is in the right place, and filled with tender love for their fallen comrades -- He was a brave soldier, and one of the first that leaped into the Rebel pits, on the charge on the 1st of June. I well remember the look of satisfaction he gave, when we took some prisoners, as he turned to me exclaiming, ?We got them! we got them.? That time he came out allright. We were all laying down in line of battle when he was shot. There was two others wounded at the same time, one of them died. Hoping, madam, that God will assist you to receive this sad intelligence with true christian patience and fortitude, bearing in mind that he who tempers the wind for the shorn lamb, will not forget the soldiers widew. (CLYDE(NY) TIMES JULY 2, 1864 p. 2)

 

Kilmer, George E of Co. C. He was also a member of Port Byron's Lockwood Post #175 GAR. Dawn Roe, beatatune@tds.net is his 2nd Great Granddaughter. She is also related to Alfred Seelye Roe: "Alfred is my 8th cousin 3 times removed."

 

McDowell, David (Company D): A Canadian who enlisted in Lyons, 1862.Mustered out June 1865. Settled in Alton, NY. Married Almira Wager. Died 1917. see obit: http://www.rootsweb.com/~nywayne/lyons/1917lyonsrepub2.html , his obit is in the 9/28/1917
Record----The death of David McDowell,a veteran of the
Civil War,and a well known Sodus resident,occurred in
the Myers hospital Wednesday morning,where he
underwent an operation a few days ago.He was seventy
five years of age. The survivors are a son,Charles
McDowell,of alton,and a daughter,Mrs. William
Berkeley,who resides near South Sodus. Mr. McDowell
was a member of Company D. 9th New York Heavy
Artillery,and was mustered out in July,1865,after
serving three years. Funeral services will be held
this afternoon at two o'clock fromthe Free Methodist
church at Alton,Rev. C.A. Fox pastor of the
church,officiating,and burial will be made in the
Alton cemetery.
Gggrandaughter, Laurie Gasper (Rubyshooze@aol.com), Gggrandaughter, Judy Mourey (trackmaker1@yahoo.com)

 

McDowell, Charles (Company D): A Canadian (born in Simcoe Canada on 15 Feb. 1837) from North Norwich in the County of Oxford , he came to New York around 1858. Married Nancy Wager (mother's maiden name Alvord ) on 24 Dec. 1860 in her father's home. Charles enlisted in Lyons, Aug. 1862. Mustered out June 1865. Settled in Alton, NY. According to records in the National Archives, he was 5' 5" with blue eyes and dark hair. Survived bullets coming so close they broke his rifle at the Battle of Monocacy. Also lived through Typhoid Fever. Received a Disablity Pension after the war stating that Typhoid Fever left him with heart desease. He was a member of the Wayne and Cayuga Veterans Association. Died April 17, 1913 of a heart attack while visiting his daughter's home on Denver, Colorado. His Obit: 4/26/1913, The Record----

A telegram was received Friday from
Denver,Colo.,announcing the death of Charles McDowell
of this town aged about 78 years. A message arrived a
short time before stating that he had been taken
ill,but death was not expected. Mr. and Mrs. McDowell
went to Denver only a few days previous to his
death,owing to the illness of their daughter,Mrs.
Edward Stuvea, who left this town several months ago
for Denver,in hopes that she could benefit her health
by a change of climate. The message received from that
city did not state the nature of Mr. McDoowell's
illness. His son, Bert McDowell,left for Denver to
bring the remains to Sodus. Mr. McDowell was born in
Canada. He came to this country when a young man, and
enlisted in Company B,Ninth New YorkHeavy
Artillery,serving in the Civil War,with grat credit.
The greater part of his life was spent in this
town,where he was an honorable and upright citizen.
His character was beyond reproach. Mr. McDowellwas a
member of the Alton Free Methodist church and of A.D.
Shaw Post, Grand Army of the Republic. Those who
survive are the widow and son and daughter memtioned,a
sister, Mrs. M.M. Brooks of Paris,Ontario,Canada and
two brothers, David of this town and William of
Paris,Canada,and five grandchildren. The funeral will
be held at the Alton Free Methodist Church Sunday at
11a.m.


Excerpt of Nancy Wager McDowell's obituary (she died in her rocking chair looking out the window on Sep. 11, 1931):

"MRS. MCDOWELL IS DEAD - SHOOK HANDS WITH LINCOLN. With the death of Mrs. Nancy Wager McDowell at the home of her son Gilbert McDowell, in Alton Friday, the town of Sodus probably loses the distinction of having a resident who could boast of having shaken hands and talked with the martyred Lincoln. Mrs. McDowell, who was 86 years old, died Friday noon after a lingering illness?Mrs. McDowell was born in the town of Rose?She was married in 1860 to Charles McDowell, a native of Canada, who came to America when a young man. Mr. McDowell was a member of the Ninth New York Heavy Artillery in the Union Army and it was while stationed near Washington that his wife had an opportunity to speak with the President. Mrs. McDowell passed nearly a year in that vicinity and many were the pies she baked for the soldiers stationed at the capital. Typhoid Fever caused her to return to Alton to the home of her parents?" ("The Record," Sodus, Wayne County, N.Y. September 18, 1931) Charles and Nancy are buried in Espenscheid Cementary, Alton, NY.

Ggrandson, Dr. Lee McDowell (lwm65@ufl.edu)

Great-Grandaughter, Virgina, Harding rvhardi@wic.net, "My mother Hazel was the daughter of May Belle McDowell, daughter of Nancy and Charles, her father was James Hiram McDowell son of James Munro McDowell,brother of Charles.

 

Private William Harvey Miller, from Ancestry.Com
William H Miller ,
Enlistment Date: 07 December 1863
Distinguished Service: DISTINGUISHED SERVICE
Side Served: Union
State Served: New York
Unit Numbers: 1355 1355
Service Record: Enlisted as a Private on 07 December 1863 at the age of
18
Enlisted in Company B, 9th Heavy Artillery Regiment New York on 29 December
1863.
Discharged Company B, 9th Heavy Artillery Regiment New York on 25 June 1865
in Washington, DC
I am a great-great nephew of William H Miller, with respect, Michael S. Kellogg, MKellogg@shaw.ca

 

Murphy, James (Company I--James's brother Michael was also in Company I). Gggrandson John Murphy, jamurphy2@adelphia.net

To learn more about James Murphy, visit:http://secure.naifa.org/family

 

Jetty, Frank (born Francois Jette) Company C Enlisted as a Private on 22 Aug 1862 at the age of 19. Mustered out June 1865 in Washington DC. Born in Quebec, Canada, of French Canadian parents Francois Jette and Adelaide Bessette, Frank entered northern Cayuga county in New York state around 1856. He married Melinda Lucas (daughter of Daniel and Charlotte Lucas) who was born in Cayuga county. After the war, Frank and Melinda raised six children: Margaret H.(Mrs Clarence E. Foster), Minnie A. (Mrs John A. Rockefeller), Frank W. III (Alice), George W. (Carrie L.), my great grandparents John A. (Mary Jane Chambers), and Frederick J. (Ruby E.), and had at least twenty-two grandchildren. All six children raised their families in northern Cayuga county. Frank farmed his entire adult life in Conquest and Mentz in Cayuga county. After Melinda's death in 1894, Frank lived with his son George in Brutus until his own death in 1917. Frank and Melinda are buried in the Weedsport Cemetery, Town of Brutus, Cayuga County, NY. Gggranddaughter Donna Bancroft Green redhouse06@hotmail.com Melinda Lucas' younger brother, William C., married Mary Jane Gillhuly, daughter of Civil War veteran, James Gillhuly. James, born in Ireland in 1818, enlisted in Company U, 9 NYHA in August 1864 at the age of 44. He was mustered out in July 1865 at Albany, NY. James married Mary Welch (also from Ireland) in Canada and the couple immigrated to Conquest, Cayuga Co, NY, around 1850. From 1857-1862, the Gillhulys had four children: Charles L. (Julia), Mary Jane (Mrs William C. Lucas), Sarah A., and James L. ( Jennie E.). James applied for a disability pension in 1878, died 23 Apr 1896, and was buried in the Conquest Village Cemetery in Cayuga Co, NY. Mary was living with son Charles in Conquest in the 1910 Census, when she was 86 years old. Almanzo Litchard, Private, Co. E, 9th N.Y.H.A. Almanzo Litchard was my great, great, great grandfather. He settled the land that my parents farm today in Rushford, NY. His daughter married Daniel Gilbert (hence my name). David E. Gilbert, Appomattox, VA, dgilbert@liberty.edu

Tim O?Connor: He fought at the battle of Monocacy, captured and was taken to Danville prison and was released on Feb 24, 1865. His health was badly damaged in prison and he never recovered it (he was 44 when he enlisted, so youth was not on his side!). After his release he returned to New York and work as a tailor, but eventually left for California via steamship thru the Isthmus of Panama to San Francisco. He worked as a tailor, health permitting, on Minna Street in San Francisco. I guess it must have been too cold and foggy there, because they took the steamer down to the costal town called Alviso (now part of San Jose). He and his family eventually settled in an area known as Bitterwater, which is the area just east of Pinnacles National Monument (about 3 hours southeast of San Francisco). There his sons and daughters raised grain and cattle and are still ranching it today. Great granddaughter, Karen.Bengard@CityofPaloAlto.org

(born Francois Jette) Company C Enlisted as a Private on 22 Aug 1862 at the age of 19. Mustered out June 1865 in Washington DC. Born in Quebec, Canada, of French Canadian parents Francois Jette and Adelaide Bessette, Frank entered northern Cayuga county in New York state around 1856. He married Melinda Lucas (daughter of Daniel and Charlotte Lucas) who was born in Cayuga county. After the war, Frank and Melinda raised six children: Margaret H.(Mrs Clarence E. Foster), Minnie A. (Mrs John A. Rockefeller), Frank W. III (Alice), George W. (Carrie L.), my great grandparents John A. (Mary Jane Chambers), and Frederick J. (Ruby E.), and had at least twenty-two grandchildren. All six children raised their families in northern Cayuga county. Frank farmed his entire adult life in Conquest and Mentz in Cayuga county. After Melinda's death in 1894, Frank lived with his son George in Brutus until his own death in 1917. Frank and Melinda are buried in the Weedsport Cemetery, Town of Brutus, Cayuga County, NY. Gggranddaughter Donna Bancroft Green Melinda Lucas' younger brother, William C., married Mary Jane Gillhuly, daughter of Civil War veteran, James Gillhuly. James, born in Ireland in 1818, enlisted in Company U, 9 NYHA in August 1864 at the age of 44. He was mustered out in July 1865 at Albany, NY. James married Mary Welch (also from Ireland) in Canada and the couple immigrated to Conquest, Cayuga Co, NY, around 1850. From 1857-1862, the Gillhulys had four children: Charles L. (Julia), Mary Jane (Mrs William C. Lucas), Sarah A., and James L. ( Jennie E.). James applied for a disability pension in 1878, died 23 Apr 1896, and was buried in the Conquest Village Cemetery in Cayuga Co, NY. Mary was living with son Charles in Conquest in the 1910 Census, when she was 86 years old. , Private, Co. E, 9th N.Y.H.A. Almanzo Litchard was my great, great, great grandfather. He settled the land that my parents farm today in Rushford, NY. His daughter married Daniel Gilbert (hence my name). David E. Gilbert, Appomattox, VA,

 

Page, Ebenezer of Palmyra, Wayne County, New York, enlisted in the Civil War on August 2, 1862 from Ontario, Wayne County, in Company B of the 138th Regiment New York Infantry. Ebenezer subsequently was appointed Corporal on August 14 at his first muster. On or near September 9, 1862, Ebenezer?s Company B became Company B of the 9th New York Heavy Artillery, which was assigned the task of building fortifications at Washington, D.C. For additional information and a timeline regarding Ebenezer?s war years, please open the following six-page PDF file:http://www.netmeister.net/~cpaige/Ebenezer_Page_military_timeline-expanded.pdf (240 KB)After the war Ebenezer settled at Brockport, Monroe County, from where he became a member of the Veteran Association of the 9th N. Y. H. Artillery upon its forming. Ebenezer was born in England April 8, 1820, and immigrated to America when nine years old with parents William H. and Martha Page and siblings. The family settled at Palmyra, Wayne County. Within the year his mother died, and two years later his father married the American-born widow Chloe (Thayer) Robinson. The family settled at Macedon, Wayne County, and soon two half brothers were born, William Henry Page, Jr. and Riley Preston Page. Ebenezer became a blacksmith, a profession he pursued throughout his adult life. In 1850 he was living in Ontario, Wayne County, with wife Elizabeth and three children. Before the decade ended Ebenezer?s father, stepmother, and half brothers settled in Branch County, Michigan, while Ebenezer remained in Wayne County, returning to Palmyra. Ebenezer and Elizabeth had seven children, four of whom were still living by 1900. Ebenezer and his wife spent their latter years in Monroe County, where he died July 5, 1911, having reached and surpassed the venerable age of 91 years. Children: William H. b: Abt. 1844; Franklin W. b: Abt. 1846 d: 3-6-1890 in Sweden Twp., Monroe Co.; Ellen b: Abt.1847; Esther b: Abt. 1852; Charlie b: 10-1855 d: 9-9-1859 in Palmyra; Charles E. b: 7-1860; Martha A. b: 9-1868 d. 9-1935. Ebenezer, and his wife Elizabeth who died in July 1907, were interred at Mt. Hope Cemetery, Rochester, New York. Provided by Charles W. Paige cpaige@netmeister.net, half great-grandnephew of Ebenezer Page (through Riley P. Page)

 

Sova, Alfred Nelson (Co. B): born in Victor, Ontario Co., New York on Jan. 11,1847. Enlisted on Dec. 19, 1863 at Walworth, Wayne Co. and mustered at Auburn on Dec. 29, 1863. He fought at Cold Harbor, Monocacy (had distinction of personally burning wooden covered bridge at Gen. Wallace's command), Cedar Creek, Petersburg Breakthrough and Saylor's Creek. He was sick in hospital from Aug. 31 to mid-Oct., 1864. He mustered out on June 16, 1865 in Washington and returned to Wayne Co., N.Y., where he married and eventually fathered six children. In 1882 he moved his family to Jackson Co, Mich., where he lived in Leoni and Grass Lake for the rest of his life. A longtime member of the G. A. R., he was recognized as the last surviving Civil War veteran in his community prior to his death on Aug. 25, 1935. Alfred is buried in Maple Grove Cemetery in Grass Lake, Mich.Great-grandson: Fred Rohrer at frohrer@comcast.net Sova, James S. (Co. K): Born 1842 in Chili, Genesee Co., New York. Enlisted Dec. 19, 1863 at Rose, Wayne Co. and mustered Dec. 30 at Auburn. Wounded at Cold Harbor on June 4, 1864 and spent several months in hospital. Family tradition says he was killed while on picket duty in Dec. 1864, but no records found. Place of burial is unknown. (brother of Alfred N. Sova)

 

Martin Vanderburgh of Company A (His brother James was also in Company A). He was born in 1837 in Huron, Wayne County NY,and settled in Berrien County Michigan after the war, dying in 1871.

Doug Price, m20wc51@yahoo.com Canton, Michigan

 

If you would like to be added to my list, please email me at saundersbooks@aol.com If you would like to forward my request for more New York 9th Heavy Artillery information and/or relatives, please feel free to foward them the following note from me: "I want to let you know about my new webpage dedicated to the New York 9th Heavy Artillery: http://www.authorlisasaunders.com/mycustompage0013.htm I have written a book about the the New York 9th Heavy Artillery (nicknamed Seward's Pets) using family letters, vintage photos, and information gleaned from out-of-print books. I have since devoted a webpage to the New York 9th which includes a timeline, links to their battles, and letter excerpts. I am searching for relatives of the New York 9th Heavy Artillery soldiers as well as any other additional information to add to my site. Please visit my website at www.authorlisasaunders.com and visit the New York 9th Heavy Artillery page. Thank you. Lisa Saunders (saundersbooks@aol.com), Daughter of Union Veterans of the American Civil War
You may also want to become a member of the following:

 

 

 

Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War

www.duvcw.org

 

Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

www.suvcw.org/

 

 

To research your ancestors in the military, visit:

http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfaol/resource/Military/

 

 

Extra Notes: Private John R. Lake, Aug. 6, 1863 9th Heavy Art.Co. A; transferred to 2nd. Art. June 27, 1865 discharged Sept. 29, 1865. Born Sept. 3, 1815, Wolcott, Wayne Co. N.Y. died on Jan. 30, 1895, buried in North Ridge Cemetery, Cambria, N.Y. Cynthia Melcher, great granddaugther, kem@bluefrog.com

New York 9th Heavy Artillery
Page created by Lisa Saunders, author of EVER TRUE:A Union Private and His Wife. To learn more about the book, which is a collection of letters during the entire service of the 9th, visit www.authorlisasaunders.com
Formorly 138th infantry, reassigned to the 9th Heavy Artillery on December 19th 1862 (February 5, 1863, the 22d N. Y. Volunteer Battery was transferred to the regiment as Company M. Company L was organized at Albany between November 4 and December 9, 1863)
  • Nickname - Second Auburn Regiment; Second Cayuga and Wayne County Regiment
Also knows as "Seward's Pets"